The Robservatory

Robservations on everything…

 

shell script

Semi-automatic Homebrew and video-transcode updates

As I’ve written about in the past, I use Don Melton’s video transcoding tools to rip Blu-Ray discs. I also use Homebrew to install some of the transcode video dependencies, as well as other Unix tools.

Keeping these tools current isn’t overly difficult; it only requires a few commands in Terminal:

$ brew update
$ brew upgrade
$ sudo gem update video_transcoding

My problem is that I often forget to do this, because—unlike most GUI Mac apps and the Mac App Store—there’s no built-in “hey, there’s an update!” system. Suddenly, two months and many revisions later, I finally remember (usually when I see a tweet about a new version of something.) So I thought I’d try to write my own simple update reminder.

I didn’t really want a scheduled task, like a launchd agent—it’s not like these tools need to stay current on a daily basis. (And one of them needs to run with admin privileges, which complicates things.) I just wanted something that would remind me if it’d been a while since I last checked for updates, and then install the updates if I wanted it to do so.

After mulling it over, I came up with a script that runs each time I open a Terminal window (which I do daily). The referenced script looks at the date on a check file, and asks me if I’d like to check for updates if that date is more than a week older than today’s date. This is perfect for my needs: The reminder is automatic, but I can choose when to install the updates based on what I’m doing at the time. If it’s been under a week since I last checked, nothing at all is different about my Terminal launch.

Read on for the script and implementation details. (Note: This is not written for a Terminal beginner, as it assumes some knowledge about how the shell works in macOS.)

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Total PDF pages in subfolders across folder structure

Last week, I wrote a script that ran through a folder structure and output the page count of every PDF in all folders and sub-folders, and also spit out a grand total.

While this worked well, what I really wanted was a script that just totaled PDF pages by sub-folder, without seeing all the file-by-file detail. After trying to retrofit the first script, I realized that was a waste of time, and started over from scratch.

The resulting script works just as I’d like it to, traversing a folder structure and showing PDF page counts by folder:

$ countpdfbydir
    47: ./_Legal
     2: ./_Medical-Dental
    15: ./_Medical-Dental/Kids
    11: ./_Medical-Dental/Marian
     2: ./_Medical-Dental/Rob
    35: ./_Personal Documents/Kids
    87: ./_Personal Documents/Marian
    28: ./_Personal Documents/Rob
    10: ./_Personal Documents/Rob/Golf
    12: ./_Personal Documents/Rob/Travel
-------------------------------------------------------------------
   249: Total PDF Pages

It took a few revisions, but I like this version; it even does some simplistic padding to keep the figures lined up in the output.

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Count pages in all PDFs within a folder structure

Please see this newer post, with a new script that provides subtotals by subfolder, which is what I really wanted when I wrote this one.

Recently I’ve been trying to go paperless (well, mostly paperless) via a Fujitsu ScanSanp ix500. (I’ll have more to say about the scanner in a future post).

One way to go paperless is to just go from now forward—start scanning stuff and don’t worry about history. I decided that I’d go the other route, and work through our old paper files: some would be scanned and kept, much would just be recycled. The process went really quickly, compared to what I had expected. It helps that the Fujitsu is a wicked-fast document scanner!

But I was curious about how much I was scanning, in terms of total PDF pages—not files, but counting the pages in the files. Spotlight to the rescue; the field kMDItemNumberOfPages returns the number of pages in a document, and it seemed accurate in testing via mdls:

$ mdls /path/to/somefile.pdf | grep kMDItemNumberOfPages
kMDItemNumberOfPages = 4

So I set out to write a script to traverse my “Scans” folder, and return the total number of PDF pages.

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Encrypt files then backup to a cloud service via script

Most cloud services tell you that their data stores are safe, that your data is encrypted in transit and on their drives, that employees don’t have access, etc. For the vast majority of the stuff I store in the cloud, this is more than good enough for me—the data isn’t overly sensitive, and if someone were to hack their way in, all they’d get are a bunch of work and personal writing files and some family photos.

For other files—primarily financial and family related—those assurances just aren’t enough for me. But I still want the flexibility and security that comes from having a copy of these files in the cloud. So what’s a paranoid user to do to take advantage of the cloud, with added security, but with a minimum of hassle?

The solution I came up with involves using local encrypted disk images and a shell script. Using this script (and some means of scheduling it), you can automatically encrypt and back up whatever files you like to a cloud service.

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My most-useful and least-used shell script

I have a large number of small shell scripts I’ve either written or collected over the years. Today I had the opportunity to use my favorite one—which is rare, as I only need it a couple times a year. But when I do need it, it’s a wonderful little script.

It’s also a very simple-minded script, as it does just one thing: it copies my public IP address to the clipboard and shows it in a pop-up message, as seen at right. OK, so that’s two things, but they’re very closely related.

Clearly this isn’t something I need to do often, but when I do, the script changes this…

Switch to browser, open new tab, load the DynDNS check IP page, drag mouse to select IP address, press Command-C to copy, switch back to destination app, press Command-V to paste

…into this…

Press a key combo, wait about a second, then press Command-V

This is a big timesaver, obviously, and it makes the process about as easy as it could be.

I originally wrote this up for Mac OS X Hints a few years back, but thought I’d post it here (given the changes at Macworld, I’m not sure how long the hints site may be around). I’ve also modified it a bit, as I no longer use growlnotify for the onscreen display of the copied IP address.

You can read the original how-to at hints, or below, where I’ve posted the updated version that no longer uses growlnotify.

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